You’ll never see this again! I mean it will not be picked up by the media, especially in the USA. It seems multivitamins help prevent cancer.


Haven’t we had it blasted in our faces for years that vitamins are a hoax; that they CAUSE cancer; that taking vitamins is just expensive pee; that vitamins might actually kill you?

We’ve seen it all. And of course it’s orchestrated media lies.

The trust is we need supplements in our modern world. The “balanced diet” baloney was never true, but even if it was, that only applied to an age gone by, when we were not living in a blizzard of toxic cancer-forming pollutants.

Today, it’s a fact, that without lashings of antioxidants and significant supplements of basic nutrients like vitamins and minerals, YOU ARE AT RISK.

And here is a study which neatly proves the point: the daily use of multivitamins may reduce the risk for cancer in men, according to the results of a very large randomized trial. The study was on male doctors as patients, which could be important.

After about 11 years, multivitamin use resulted in a modest but statistically significant reduction — specifically, an 8% reduction in total cancer incidence.

They are calling that “modest”? Big Pharma garbage cannot come even close to such a result. In fact they are lucky if they can show even 1 – 2% improvement over placebo. But if they can, that entitles them to spin it out into nonsense like “proven to be effective” and so on.

In fact, if you remove prostate cancer cases from this study, the remaining cancers showed a MASSIVE 12% reduction in total cancers which was “significant”, said lead author John Michael Gaziano, MD, MPH. He was speaking at a press briefing ahead of a presentation at the Annual American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research meeting.

Significant means it’s scientifically proven, not a hoax or anomaly.

That’s 1 in 10 lives saved!! Chemo and other pharmaceuticals cannot come close to that.

This study was a large-scale, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that included 14, 641 male US physicians who were 50 years or older when the study began. The cohort included 1312 men with a history of cancer. The multivitamin study began in 1997, with treatment and follow-up that continued through June 1, 2011.

In other words, it was really good science.

But when reporting it, the medical press keep factoring in “modest”, which is a bit different to Big Pharma lies and exaggerations. Also, they quickly limited it by saying this benefit only applies to men over 50!

But, that’s what they do: shout it when it fits with their beliefs and try to limit the damage when it proves they have been wrong all along.

What is also important with this study is that it was long; 17 years in fact. In addition, Dr. Gaziano pointed out that this study was well controlled. The participants who were randomized to the multivitamin arm were all taking the exact same brand and formulation (Centrum Silver), which has not necessarily been the case in other studies.

Researchers from the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, Corvallis, are reported as saying that this data “conclusively shows that multivitamins are safe to take, help fill important nutritional gaps, reduce cancer risk and in turn will help cut health care costs.”

“An 8 percent drop in overall cancer rates is not small,” said Balz Frei, PhD, professor and director of the Linus Pauling Institute, in a statement.

“Given that more than 1.6 million new cancer cases are diagnosed in the U.S. each year, this translates into about 130,000 cancers prevented every year, and with it all the health care costs and human suffering,” commented Dr. Frei, who was not involved in the study.

Dr. Frei also pointed out that the effect might be even higher in other population groups than seen in this study. “And it’s worth noting that the research was done with 14,600 physicians,” Dr. Frei said. “This highly-educated group has a better diet, knowledge base and health habits than the average person, so it’s reasonable to believe that the impact of multivitamin use in the general population will be even greater.”

[SOURCES: 11th Annual AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, Presented October 17, 2012. JAMA. 2012. Published online October 17, 2012]