But That’s Not All…

(part 1 of this article is here if you missed it…)

Coffee and hot tea consumption were found to be protective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).[35] While it remains unclear whether the beverages have systemic antimicrobial activity, study participants who reported any consumption of either were approximately half as likely to have MRSA in their nasal passages.

The Downside

I already mentioned the negative effect on blood pressure and Huntington’s chorea.

There are more negatives, notably the tendency of caffeine to cause or worsen anxiety, insomnia, and tremor and potentially elevate glaucoma risk.[38]

Also, given the potential severity of symptoms, caffeine withdrawal syndrome is under consideration for inclusion in the forthcoming DSM-5.[39]

Am I Saying Start Drinking Coffee?

Not really. If you don’t drink coffee, this is not an inducement to start.

But if you do, then maybe that second cup isn’t so naughty after all.

Just remember, these tests are for COFFEE alone (dark espresso), not lattes, mochas, cappuccino and all the other drinks with gooey syrup, sugar, milk etc. Those are BAD and are not exonerated by this science.

Also remember It’s the antioxidants in the roasted and fermented bean, not the caffeine. No-one has produced evidence to my knowledge that caffeine by itself does all those good things!

References

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3. Wu JN, Ho SC, Zhou C, et al. Coffee consumption and risk of coronary heart diseases: a meta-analysis of 21 prospective cohort studies. Int J Cardiol. 2009;137:216-225.
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