The Pharma vaccination heist that’s planned for this fall has met some serious opposition: hard facts and cool common sense!

Those who stand to gain are insisting that when the flu revisits this fall it will be much more severe than the first spring “herald wave” we had. They are banking on it (literally!)

Trouble is that if you look at the facts, meaning the history of flu epidemics, it just isn’t true. The idea it starts mild and gets stronger by picking up mutations is a myth, according to leading experts of today.

“Pandemic history suggests that changes neither in transmissibility nor in pathogenicity are inevitable,” concluded Drs. David Morens and Jeffery Taubenberger, infectious disease experts at the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.

In an article published in the Aug. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, the experts blast the much-publicized theory that the next round of flu will be more severe (as predicted by the CNN and CBS Institute of Medical Science!! Ha ha!)

The so-called “herald wave” theory stems from the belief that the deadly 1918-19 flu pandemic began with a milder spring wave of illness, which got more deadly as the virus spread throughout the summer, picking up lethal mutations.

However, while flu outbreaks were noted in Europe in the spring of 1918, no viruses from these outbreaks have yet been identified, according to Morens and Taubenberger. The truth is the actual course of the 1918 pandemic flu varied greatly around the world and most areas experienced no “spring herald wave” at all.

Another top expert has weighed in and attacked this stupid theory by the sneaky use of facts! Dr. Pascal James Imperato, dean of the school of public health at SUNY Downstate Medical Center in New York City, said that looking back at 20th century flu pandemics, “secondary waves have pretty much been either the same or even of less epidemiologic significance than the first wave.”

Imperato concurred with that assessment. Swine flu is “still circulating,” he said, “and that means that a lot of people have developed protection against it, plus we have the advantage that it’s a descendant of other H1N1 viruses that were in circulation in the late ’70s through the ’80s, so older people have solid protection.”

“It’s hard to conceive that if the H1N1 should reappear in the fall in the Northern Hemisphere that we would have a more severe epidemic,” he said.

So much for junk media science.

It could cost these rebel experts their jobs, of course. Or likely they’ll be discredited as idiots by media lackeys like Sanjay Gupta.

But facts are facts and it’s refreshing to get a sudden sweet bouquet of them!

SOURCE: Aug. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association

Of course, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius is holding to the fact that, even if the outbreak is very mild (as I predict), people should still get vaccinated. Why, Kathleen? Explain that to me in simple language…